Alert on The Transatlantic Trade and Investment Partnership (TTIP)

Screen shot 2015-11-04 at 8.19.10 PM

Liberty Leading the People – Eugene Delacroix, 1830

How did we reach a point where treaties such as the TTIP are presented as “done deals” – where democracy is bypassed and agreements are made in secret? The TTIP is the European/US equivalent of the US Pacific Rim ‘free trade’ agreement. It’s important to know that both ‘partnerships’ are actually binding treaties.

Some of the consequences for the people of EU and the US with the TTIP include:

  1. The “investor-state dispute settlement (ISDS) rules.” These Rules will enable corporations to sue governments in cases where they feel they have not had “fair and equitable” treatment. Corporations can sue EU/US governments whenever national regulations are changed in any way that impede a corporation’s “right to make profits” – INCLUDING labor standards.
  1. The ISDS courts takes away the ability of member states to decide what should stay in the public sector and gives the power to decide this to unelected and unaccountable corporations. Such dispute cases are usually heard in secret and “arbitrated by a relatively small group of unaccountable specialist lawyers whose impartiality has been called into question.” [2]
  1. The “regulatory exchange” proposal within the TIPP will force laws that are drafted by democratically-elected politicians to go through an extensive screening process. This process will occur throughout the 78 States, not just in Brussels and Washington DC. Laws will be evaluated on whether or not they are compatible with the economic interests of major companies! Responsibility for this screening will lie with the ‘Regulatory cooperation body’ a permanent, undemocratic, unaccountable and unelected group of European and American bureau/technocrats
  1. The European Commission promises up to one percent GDP growth and massive job creation as a result of the trade deal. But this is not supported –even by its own studies!

As was shown in a leaked EU document, the EU-US Regulatory Cooperation Council as part of the TTIP deal was organized as a permanent structure to ensure the rights of corporate free trade. So where is the permanent structure for ordinary people” to ensure their rights from encroachment from corporate power?

Who is protecting the animals, the air, the plants within consideration of what is best for all? How can we actively challenge words like “free trade” which sound fair but are in fact the opposite? What can citizens do to enhance Freedom of Information laws in their countries? How can we further this type of legislation and enhance transparency?

Some links from the left, right and in between

http://www.globalresearch.ca/the-transatlantic-trade-and-investment-partnership-ttip-a-brief-history-of-an-agenda-for-corporate-plunder/5407780

http://www.theguardian.com/business/ttip

http://www.equaltimes.org/what-does-the-ttip-really-mean-for?lang=en#.VZv-F0XEhVY

http://www.globalresearch.ca/fast-tracking-tisa-stealth-block-to-monetary-reform-the-banking-game-exposed/5455231

http://www.thenewamerican.com/usnews/constitution/item/20898-living-evolving-dangers-are-hidden-in-obamatrade-tpp-ttip

 

Present Students, Future Slaves

Screen shot 2015-10-30 at 9.32.17 PM

The Slave Ship 1840 William Turner

Every generation for the last 30 years has endorsed neoliberal policies, leaving today’s young people not only without a voice, but also saddled with a set of economic, political and social conditions that have rendered them devalued, marginalized and ultimately disposable. Henry Giroux

Philosopher and political thinker, Sheldon Wollin died this month. His claim that the U.S. government operates, not as a democracy but in what he called “inverted totalitarianism” – “every natural resource and every living being is seen as a commodity and exploited to collapse as the citizenry is lulled and manipulated into surrendering their liberties and their participation in government through excess consumerism and sensationalism” and nowhere is this better exemplified than in our student debt crisis.

The average American student debt upon graduation is $29,400 and this while America’s federal government projects a record $50-billion profit on student loans in 2014! This makes the student loan business the most profitable business in America. (ExxonMobil made $44.9 billion in 2012)

The usury attached to a college education in America supports massive  hierarchy, concentration of power and wealth, and greater inequality. The fact that a higher education is financially out of the reach for the majority, ensures that only an elite will continue to control and lead the future of our country.

While profits soar for the government,  the young people have little time for political engagement or creative experimentation. The debt burden forces graduates to make career decisions based on the bottom line.  They don’t have time to become involved in not-for-profit jobs or peace-promoting activities. This level of debt load creates a disconnect from the social needs of the community. In a market-driven society the only obligation is to be a good consumer. The liberal arts and the investigation of subjects that explore the imagination and how power is created is not supported.

What type of future are we creating? Why is it Germany and other EU countries have completely eliminated college tuition?

In 2013 legislators in Oregon unanimously passed a bill that instructs the state’s Higher Education Coordination Commission to develop a “Pay It Forward, Pay It Back” plan to finance public higher education. Under the plan, students pay nothing while in school, then pay a fixed percentage of their income (3 percent after a 4-year degree) to fund higher education going forward. This is at the very least a step in the right direction.

Rest in Peace, Sheldon Wolin.

Some relevant links:

The Ripple Effects of Rising Student Debt
http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/25/business/the-ripple-effects-of-rising-student-debt.html?_r=0

Left Behind
http://www.truth-out.org/opinion/item/68:left-behind-american-youth-and-the-global-fight-for-democracy
A Crisis of Affordability
http://www.alternet.org/story/134770/a_crisis_of_affordability%3A_how_our_public_colleges_are_turning_into_gated_communities_for_the_wealthy

NY Times Obit: Sheldon Wolin
http://www.nytimes.com/2015/10/29/us/politics/sheldon-s-wolin-theorist-who-shifted-political-science-back-to-politics-dies-at-93.html?src=me&_r=0&mtrref=undefined&gwh=AE7CE4FE9C9EF8F3A1637C55432A360E&gwt=paA

Making Waste a Resource

ColdSPring

Cold Spring, NY

The level of food waste in our world is estimated by the Rome-based Food and Agriculture Organisation (FAO) to be 1.3 billion tons of food wasted every year.

If epigenetics has any validity we (as a species) can’t have totally forgotten the hundreds of thousands of years we lived in a natural relationship with the earth. In our current acceptance of progress and competition our estrangement from the earth is reflected in our waste. One way that we could successfully stop the massive waste of food worldwide is to support and adopt the principles and practice of Permaculture.

Permaculture first began as an agricultural-based practice but it is now a living philosophy that can be applied to address solutions on the community and national level. Permaculture is aligned with the principles of the Equal Life Foundation in that the philosophy recognizes the fact that no single problem or solution stands on its own. The Permaculture approach, like the Equal Life Foundation promotes the use of existing resources and infrastructure to correct our relationship to each other and the natural world.

Permaculture works with nature, not against it. It uses observation and investigation rather than thoughtless labor. Each element should perform many functions, rather than one as everything is connected to everything else.

All solutions come from us – where else could they come from?  Permaculture enhances the self-confidence and ownership we need to create solutions and alternatives. It challenges the energy-intensive and pollution-producing linear distribution networks that produce food waste. Waste, if not able to be eaten, can be used to compost,  making “waste”  a resource.

Some other solutions to the problem of food waste include:

International Food Distribution Network: http://www.redistribute.me/

FoodCloud : a company that uses technology to link retailers holding excess food with charities. http://foodcloud.net/

Gleaning Network UK coordinates teams of volunteers with willing farmers across the UK to direct surplus produce to charities that redistribute it to people that need it most.

Food Waste Collective in Brighton, UK

Other Notes:

“Permaculture was created in the 1970’s by Bill Mollison, an Australian ecologist and University of Tasmania professor. He had spent many years out in nature as a wildlife biologist observing how natural systems work and became very distressed at the destruction that he saw going on around him. He decided that instead of being angry about what was happening and reacting against the destruction he wanted to work on creating a positive solution And he thought the solution would be living based on the patterns he had observed in nature.” [1]

http://www.heathcote.org/PCIntro/2WhatIsPermaculture.htm

More links on Permaculture:

Permaculture Research Institute

http://permaculturenews.org/2012/06/28/hope-for-a-new-era-before-after-examples-of-permaculture-earth-restoration-solving-our-problems-from-the-ground-up/

http://www.neverendingfood.org/about/

The Links among plants:

http://www.bbc.com/earth/story/20141111-plants-have-a-hidden-internet

“The more we learn about these underground networks [of plants], the more our ideas about plants have to change. They aren’t just sitting there quietly growing. By linking to the fungal network they can help out their neighbours by sharing nutrients and information – or sabotage unwelcome plants by spreading toxic chemicals through the network. This “wood wide web”, it turns out, even has its own version of cybercrime.

We can each begin by composting nation-wide and in the individual household level.

What’s the Cure for Corruption?

corruption

“Industry does everything they can and gets away with it almost all the time, whether it’s the coal industry, not the subject of this hearing, or water or whatever. They will cut corners, and they will get away with it. ” Sen. Jay Rockefeller, D, WVa

“To ask why there is corruption is a pertinent question…Our society has been made by us – we are the architects of it. And because the foundation is wrong…it is bound to be corrupt” Osho

The normalization of dishonest and fraudulent acts – from the small dishonest acts to the systemic institutional ones, makes it clear that the constraints we have to prevent corruption are unable to control or compete with the manic pursuit of self-interest.

Doctors prescribe drugs to strangers that they would not give their own children. Hedge fund managers buy the rights to critical drugs and then hike the price up 5000%. Pharmaceutical industry’s PAC money funnels massive amounts of cash to every member of congress. Treaties like the TPP would extend Big Pharma’s patent rights to other countries. We have judges caught getting kick-backs for sending kids to for-profit prisons, prisons that push for 100 percent occupancy and charge exorbitant rates for phone calls, basic necessities and who lobby for longer sentences and the list goes on…are we all “sharks doing what sharks do?” How can we investigate the deeper, systemic problem within each of us where we allow corruption to exist on a personal level?

Working from the inside (ourselves) out (the world system) we could start with our general conditioning – the belief that equates survival with competition. This leads to justification, blame and lies – it is then that our personal desires come to dominate the principles we say we live by.

How can we correct our fear towards the very “system” we allow? What is the extent of control that money imposes on us and how can we gain control over our relationship to money? How can we change undermining beliefs such as “this is the way it is and it can’t be changed?”

Solitary Confinement is Torture

Screen shot 2015-10-04 at 9.28.05 PM
“Solitary confinement can have serious psychological, psychiatric, and sometime physiological effects on many prison inmates. A long list of possible symptoms from insomnia and confusion to hallucinations and outright insanity…The overall consistency of these findings—the same or similar conclusions reached by different researchers examining different facilities, in different parts of the world, in different decades, using different research methods—is striking.”
Brief for Professors & Practitioners of Psychology & Psychiatry

Studies and longitudinal research have show the serious psychological and physiological effects of solitary confinement – yet it is currently being imposed on over 80,000 Americans – and that number is growing.

In the U.S. both adults and children are placed in isolation. Over 62,000 minors are being held in over 2,000 juvenile facilities, and approximately 1 in 5 of use isolation.  The Journal of the American Academy of Child found that incarcerated juveniles had 10 times the rate of diagnosed mental illness as children “on the outside.”

80,000+ Americans live a solitary confinement nightmare. These prisoners are physically isolated and confined to their cells for 22 to 24 hours a day, with only minimal interaction with others.

International laws and guidelines are very clear in saying that solitary confinement has no rehabilitative qualities to support it’s use and that lengthy conditions of harsh solitary confinement constitute either torture or cruel, inhuman, and degrading treatment.

Solitary confinement is justified as disciplinary punishment – both as a way to protect vulnerable prisoners and as a way for  prison staff to ‘manage’ difficult individuals. It is used to isolate detainees during the pre-trial stage of investigation, as part of coercive interrogation and it is a method used to lock away prisoners especially those perceived to have mental illnesses this despite the UN Standard Minimum Rules for the Treatment of Prisoners which states that ‘Imprisonment and other measures which result in cutting off an offender from the outside world are afflictive by the very fact of taking from the person the right of self-determination by depriving him of his liberty. Therefore the prison system shall not, except as incidental to justifiable segregation or the maintenance of discipline, aggravate the suffering inherent in such a situation.’ (Rule 57)

Not only does solitary confinement violate international law and guidelines it also violates the 8th amendment of the U.S. constitution which says,  “Excessive bail shall not be required, nor excessive fines imposed, nor cruel and unusual punishments inflicted.”  And yet, with only a very few exceptions, U.S. federal courts have disagreed – this, despite one U.S. Senate hearing testimony on the psychological effects of solitary which described a prisoner that used thread to sew his mouth shut, another inmate who chewed off his finger and another took a television apart and ate it.

‘Isolation syndrome’ is the name used to describe the consequence of prolonged solitary confinement. Symptoms include anxiety, depression, anger, cognitive disturbances, perceptual distortions, paranoia, psychosis, self-harm and suicide.  The only sporadic contact that prisoners have is with guards, despite the research that family contact is one of the most important factors in successful rehabilitation. Solitary prohibits the very thing needed for a new life – access to loved ones and support networks. And while some prisoners are able to construct meaning and occupy their time without going crazy, others are not so able, experiencing severe depression and crushing mental illness.

International observer Tessa Murphy of Amnesty International’s Campaigner on the United States has said, ““The USA’s isolation system is a shocking and outdated form of punishment which should have no place in any country purporting to respect human rights principles. The fact that anyone is able to survive the inhumanity of a system which seems specifically designed to break them is incredible.”

Lawyer Clive Stafford Smith said: “Solitary confinement is one of the techniques used to ‘break’ prisoners in Guantánamo Bay.  Sadly I can testify that it has the sickening, desired impact, and has caused serious mental health problems for the people I represent.  We  should put these ugly human experiments behind us.
Another dimension that is very worrisome and shocking are the for-profit companies responsible for approximately 6 percent of state prisoners, 16 percent of federal prisoners, and inmates in local jails in Texas, Louisiana, and other states. This means for-profit companies decide which prisoners are kept in solitary and for how long. Private prisons have have been shown to use excessive of solitary confinement

The fact is that solitary confinement doesn’t work: One  2001 study of recidivism in Connecticut found that prisoners who had been held in solitary confinement were about 50 percent more likely to be rearrested within three years than those who had not. A study in Washington state found that inmates who had spent three months or longer in solitary were not only more likely to re-offend but were much more likely to commit a violent crime. In the report, Confronting Confinement (Commission on Safety and Abuse in America’s Prisons) they found, “the disconnect between what we know to work and the laws and policies legislatures implement is perhaps greater in this field than in any other area of social policy.”

Human contact constitutes a basic human need and as such our courts, legislators and prison officials need to recognize the serious psychological and physical pain resulting from isolation. Solitary confinement is torture and it must be stopped.

Some good news:
The movement to end juvenile solitary has gotten a boost from the Annie E. Casey Foundation, whose recommendations on juvenile justice reform have been adopted by more than 200 jurisdictions, including Baltimore, San Francisco, and Dallas County, Texas.

New York City’s Board of Correction voted to end solitary for inmates under 21 starting in January 2016.
Sept 2015: California agreed Tuesday to end its unlimited isolation of imprisoned gang leaders, restricting a practice that once kept hundreds of inmates in notorious segregation units for a decade or longer.

See links for more information. Consider joining organizations like the Campaign for Alternatives to Isolated confinement.

http://nycaic.org/
The goal of the Campaign for Alternatives to Isolated Confinement (CAIC) is sweeping reform of New York’s use of solitary confinement and other forms of extreme isolation in state prisons and local jails.

Recommended: The Friend’s Service Committee’s fact sheet : The American Friends Service Committee (AFSC) is a Quaker organization that promotes lasting peace with justice

https://www.afsc.org/resource/solitary-confinement-facts

http://www.motherjones.com/politics/2014/01/juveniles-kids-solitary-confinement-ohio-new-york

http://www.andyworthington.co.uk/2010/12/10/on-human-rights-day-public-figures-call-for-worldwide-ban-on-solitary-confinement-and-prisoner-isolation/#sthash.hVTKUoAJ.dpuf

Brief for Professors & Practitioners of Psychology & Psychiatry as Amici Curiae Support-ing Respondent at 4, Wilkinson v. Austin (Austin V, 545 U.S. 209 (2005) (No. 04-495).

Growing Up Locked Down
https://www.hrw.org/report/2012/10/10/growing-locked-down/youth-solitary-confinement-jails-and-prisons-across-united

http://www.afscme.org/news/publications/privatization/power-tools-to-fight-privatization/document/5-Prisons-Factsheet.pdf

The Shocking Abuse of Solitary Confinement in U.S. Prisons
http://blog.amnestyusa.org/americas/the-shocking-abuse-of-solitary-confinement-in-u-s-prisons/

Recidivism in Connecticut
http://www.ct.gov/opm/lib/opm/cjppd/cjresearch/recidivismstudy/2001recidivisminconnecticut.pdf

Confronting Confinement
http://www.vera.org/sites/default/files/resources/downloads/Confronting_Confinement.pdf

A Living Income addresses the primary cause of conflict: inequality

 Screen shot 2015-09-29 at 9.00.48 PM

We have been in this care centre for almost four years, living in broken tents and with no one helping us.
Pikas Kapi, Bulolo care centre, Bulolo town, Morobe province Papua New Guinea

Inequality is on the rise worldwide, creating extreme disparities in wealth, education and other areas of human development. Inequality has caused increased marginalization of mostly rural geographic areas and this in turn has caused the rising up of “formerly repressed sectors of society seeking greater independence, power and control.” These countries “were among the most economically vulnerable and least able to cope with crisis.”

Wealth disparity when combined with all the armed conflicts and an abundance of weapons puts civilians at risk unlike in any time in world history. 2014 was a record-breaking year for displaced people. Over 38 million were forcibly displaced within their own country by violence, up from 33.3 million for 2013. 2015 will be even higher and there’s no end in sight. [1]

The corporate media is not compelled to investigate the displaced or to make the connection between inequality and conflict. The media is not compelled to demand solutions. So why do we expect it to?

A living income will allow many more of us to not only read, but read between the lines and challenge the policies of war, the impunity of weapons manufacturers and the prevalence of conflict and poverty – for starters.

A living income would help us understand and challenge the ways and means of conflict so that we can build economic and social parity and give to each other that which we all deserve and desire.

* According to the Internal Displacement Monitoring Centre

http://www.internal-displacement.org

The ‘Clock Boy’ and Competing Narratives

Screen shot 2015-09-23 at 3.35.22 PM

This is not America. That is not us. This is not like us.
Mohammed Al Hassen, father of Ahmed Mohamed

What are we indignant about today? It seems being indignant is the preferred response to a world of abuse, violence and destruction. Perhaps the dissonance between living in “the land of the free” and the reality of the U.S. war economy is so great that being in the state of outrage is the only power we believe we have left.

As a country it seems we’ve backed ourselves so far into disassociation from common sense that when a thirteen year old boy is handcuffed, suspended and treated like a terrorist, we don’t immediately ask: How come his teachers didn’t know this student better?

News outlets are the equivalent of the film Roshamon  each touting conflicting agendas. Are we aware of the motives behind the various narratives? Do we question whether or not we are being nudged within using what we think we already believe to then accept and believe something else? How well do we read symbols and question the telling?

We neglect to be  to be indignant about the completely undemocratic activities occurring right in front of us, like the secret trade agreement negotiations – treaties that when they are no longer secret, will dramatically alter our lives and our world. Why haven’t these startling proposals received the media attention they deserve?

Why don’t we use our ‘indignant’ energy to ground ourselves in common sense for the common good?

Notes:

Nudging News Producers and Consumers Toward More Thoughtful, Less Polarized Discourse
http://www.brookings.edu/~/media/research/files/papers/2014/02/05-news-media-polarization/west-stone_nudging-news-consumers-and-producers.pdf

The New Media and Social Change
http://www.thehatchergroup.com/doc/Social_Media_091009.pdf

Conflict Resolution: within and without

Mlk_2

Cicero argued that a good orator needed also to be a good man, a person enlightened on a variety of civic topics.

At Truthdig.org, Chris Hedges says we must overthrow the existing political and power structures : “there will be no genuine democratic, social, economic or political reform until we destroy our permanent war machine.” According to Hedges, we live in a ‘managed democracy’ – a political form in which governments are legitimated by elections that they have learned to control

Before we run for the pitchforks, let’s think about this: can’t we slow down and come up with a way to get the money out of politics? Am I just naïve and there’s no point in a making the effort? I saw a bumper sticker that said, “you can’t buy my vote” – OK, but your vote can’t buy anything except more of the same– so there’s that – the “that” being that there is a job to be done: educating ourselves and each other. It’s not easy, but what are the alternatives?

Hedge’s mentor, Sheldon Wollin, says we vastly underestimate the essential role propaganda plays– that it is the mechanism of control – and that in spite of alternative media, propaganda keeps the corporate interests in their hegemonic vise grip.

Martin Luther King was a master at cutting through the prevailing propaganda to reflect the ludicrous nature of poverty in the richest country in the world and the embedded racism in the ‘home of the free.’

King’s biggest threat to the establishment (IMHO) was his ability to communicate the potential within each of us for self-empowerment and direct action…to use “ grace, humor and intelligence to “confront the other party with a list of injustices and a plan for addressing and resolving these injustices… Do not seek to humiliate the opponent but to call forth the good in the opponent.”

Each person lives in a kind of solitary confinement – even  so-called bad guys will like children or dogs so how can penetrate the isolation and humanity and use propaganda to our advantage –  to break out the latent action heroes within each of us?

Cynicism is easy, you just turn away…but wouldn’t it be cool to stand, see and live our potential…and
A) get the money out of politics and
B) End poverty and provide a Living Income Guaranteed for all?

Notes:

http://www.thekingcenter.org/king-philosophy#sthash.pmEpmyjg.dpuf

Karma and I and #AshleyMadisonHack

 Screen shot 2015-08-20 at 5.39.33 PM

I’ve been mulling over the idea of ‘karma’ and voilà, the #AshleyMadisonHack…it’s a metaphor, it’s symptomic, it’s #cyberkarma on a platter! It’s like some dystopian PHD diss-ertation (Western Karma and Full Disclosure ) that you write before you move to Bejing to teach English  touching on so many layers of duplicity, perceived needs, dissassociation etc etc… What a show about our ability to live in alternate realities!

So would we still act and be who we are if everything about us was disclosed?

Screen shot 2015-08-20 at 5.44.47 PM

Meanwhile, one of 60 million refugees from last year alone … and in spite of the full disclosure of such unnecessary evil, we do not work together to stop this. Should we expect karma to come knocking?

Learning isn’t linear and evolution isn’t something we learn from ‘out there’ and then ingest and feel better …
I think we have to do something, show something, We must evolve ourselves. But for what purpose? Would you wish to reincarnate here again? Is this a world you would want to come back to? Am I getting too woo-woo?

woowoo (Secret Knowledge … invoking Neo- Platonism and Rosicrucianism; rejection of ‘rational’ logic while preaching a reconciliation of science and mysticism: a smorgasbord approach to other revealed religions and ‘teachers’; and a final opt-out to the ‘inner self’ when the going got sticky. Equally significant was the need for lots of money (which was duly forthcoming), and the way that exposure of fraud and scandal perversely strengthened the authority of the most unlikely people, often through their manipulation of paranoia and conspiracy theory.”

If I only consider my own life and I end up despondent and sad because I have only created memories —my karma is not the instant payback variety a la #AshleyMadisonHack, it’s much worse than that. It means I haven’t created anything of lasting value.

Meaning requires creation otherwise it’s ephemeral – like memories.
It’s not ‘pollyannish’ to say that humans have shown the ability to work together along with the worldwide immediate needs of so many  – Karma means action and work as well as cause and effect – and everyday we have a choice  #HeavenOnEarth or #HackedHellOnWheels ?

Migration and Reason

Screen shot 2015-08-11 at 9.36.52 PM

The Zaatari refugee camp in Jordan is home for 160,000 refugees who have escaped the brutal Syrian civil war. 6,000 people arrive a day (Getty Images)

The number of refugees has dramatically increased over the past three years with almost 60 million people migrated from their homes in 201440 percent more than in 2011. There exists a false perception that the majority of the immigrants to Europe are economic migrants. But they are not: they flee as desperate asylum seekers, not economic migrants. They flee persecution and human rights abuses.

The main countries of origin are Syria, Eritrea, Somali and Afghanistan while millions are being driven out of the Sudan, Yemen, Iraq, and Lebanon. The Syrian civil war, instigated by the United States and its Arab allies in 2011 has caused more than 3.5 million people over the border with an additional 7.5 million people within Syria having fled their homes from a volatility that is the direct and indirect consequence of the continued and centuries long exploitation of the continent by Europe and the United States. Nobody wants them.

Like modern Gullivers, (see gullible, google, yahoos etc) pinned and nudged to be ‘reasonable’ we watch the jackboot of the Hegelian dialectic speed up time, dismantle countries, and take the lives of children and beings we do not know – people we do not see, people we evidently do not regard as equals.

As Alan Watt recently noted on his radio show, our thoughts about such atrocities are accepted as real, while reason – the part where we recognize that we are all fundamentally similar and equal – that part we can’t seem to access.

Are we not are in danger of  becoming displaced ourselves –  psychologically deadened and damaged by merely observing and not acting to create alternatives to the “…hidden injuries, hidden wounds that have been inflicted on [the] children [of Syria] because of what they have experienced; the behavioral changes, the nightmares that they carry around with them – the way in which they can no longer function as normal children do”?

A wise man said, “the answer is never in the context that created the problem…thus let the past go and create the future.”

Damage of conflict on Syrian Children

http://www.voanews.com/content/un-highlights-effects-of-damaging-conflict-on-syrian-children/1868559.html

What is life like inside the largest Syrian refugee camp

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/jordan/11782770/What-is-life-like-inside-the-largest-Syrian-refugee-camp-Zaatari-in-Jordan.html

Blog at WordPress.com.

Follow

Get every new post delivered to your Inbox.

Join 50 other followers